• Today there are almost a billion TV sets in the world.
  • China has the most TV sets (200 million).
  • US citizens watch the most TV. By age 65, an American would have watched the equivalent of 9 years uninterrupted screening, viewing more than 20,000 TV commercials per year.
  • The first daily broadcast was started by the BBC in November 1936.
  • The largest movie theatre in the world, Radio City Music Hall in New York, opened in 1932 – it seats almost 6,000 people.
  • In 1919, 18-year-old Walt Disney teamed up with Ub Iwerks, to produce a series of cartoons entitled “Alice in Cartoonland.”
  • The Walt Disney company was founded in 1923, and in 1927 Walt came up with the idea for an animated mouse called Mortimer Mouse. His wife Lillian convinced him to change it to Mickey Mouse.
  • In 1937 Disney won a special Oscar for the first full-length animation: “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.”
  • Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera, created Tom and Jerry in 1939.
  • The first Best Picture Oscar for an animation was awarded in 1991 for Disney’s Beauty and the Beast.
  • Mel Blanc, who played the voice of Bugs Bunny, was allergic to carrots.
  • Jack Mercer was the voice of Popeye the Sailor for 45 years.
  • The video recording machine was invented by the Ampex corporation of California in 1956. The first video recorder, the Ampex VR1000, stood 1,1 m (3 ft 3 in) high and weighed as much as a small car: 665 kg (1,466 lb).
  • The home video recorder was introduced in 1972 by Philips of the Netherlands.
  • Japanese company JVC introduced the VHS system in 1976.
  • About 80% of VCRs are made by Japanese companies.
  • The first pop video was Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen, released in 1975.
  • About one quarter of movie videos sold are animations.
  • In the 1926 film version of Don Juan actor Lionel Barrymore set the record for the most kisses ever in a single film. Barrymore embraced Mary Astor and Estelle Taylor 127 times.
  • The longest kiss in a movie is in Andy Warhol’s Kiss. Rufus Collins and Naomi Levine kissed for the entire 50 minutes of the movie.
  • The first movie to use sound was “The Jazz Singer,” released in 1927: the first words, spoken by Al Jolson, were: “Wait a minute, you ain’t heard nothing yet.”
  • The 1967 Russian movie War and Peace had 120,000 extras. The South Korean movie Monster Wang-magwi from the same year featured 157,000 extras. The 1945 German movie Kolberg had 187,000 and the movie with the most extras, the 1982 British movie Gandhi, featured 300,000 extras.

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